Why Macron’s France will be the most powerful since World War II

France and its new President, Emmanuel Macron, have inherited a good chunk of the reliance of their numerous allies to maintain global peace and security. It probably wasn’t what the newcomer head of government was looking to win when he ran as an outside chance, almost a protest candidate, in France’s presidential race, but in 2016, the shift began with a series of political upsets, unpredictable elections, and destabilising forces, to what has now emerged as a new era for France on the world stage.

The Queen’s Speech for International Relations

While the Queen’s Speech today in Westminster focussed largely on constitutional and welfare matters for Britain, it outlined the UK’s plans for its year in international affairs, and not just those rigid state visits. Here is a phrase-by-phrase analysis of the key global facing parts of The Gracious Address: My government will renegotiate the United…

How #EdBalls won #EdBallsDay: In Defence of the Oddity

 by Winning Over the Public #EdballsDay is a bizarre phenomenon in the United Kingdom. On the 28th of May, CyberBrits celebrate the fact that Labour shadow chancellor Ed Balls accidentally tweeted his own name while attempting to search twitter for an article circulating about him. After realising his gaffe, the Labour heavyweight did not delete…

Why London should not have a separate, higher minimum wage

The gap between the lowest paid workers in London and those elsewhere is shrinking. Something must be done, says Kitty Ussher, to widen it. That something, according to the former Labour Treasury minister, is to raise the minimum wage but only in London. Ussher proposes a separate minimum for London at £6.75, and argues that…